All My Obsessions

Fandom things. My own musings. Travel shenanigans. Things I find pretty. Disclaimer: Just because I reblog it, doesn't mean I agree wholeheartedly (This is largely concerning certain areas of fandom snark, some of it just gives me a giggle. I am studying for the Bar. I NEED ALL OF THE GIGGLES I CAN GET). If you're curious about anything, go ahead and ask. I'm friendly enough. If you send me an ask, tell me if you want me to publish it or not, because unless otherwise stated, i'll answer in private.

historywithwomen:

Enda St. Vincent Millay (1892 – 1950)
Enda St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright, born February 22, 1892, to Cora Bruzelle and Henry Millay, the oldest of three daughters. In 1899, her mother asked her father to leave, although they legally divorced in 1904. Millay and her mother and sister settled in Camden, Maine, where they lived with Millay’s aunt. 
Millay’s mother taught her children to be independent and ambitious, which often got them into trouble at school. While at school, Millay had relationships with several other girls there. It was here she started writing poetry, first writing in her school’s magazine. She was also published in a children’s magazine and won several awards for her poetry.
In 1912 Millay’s poem Renascence won fourth place and was published in the poetry book The Lyric Year. This success brought Millay a small amount of fame, and an offer from Caroline Dow, who heard Millay recite her poems at an inn in Camden, to pay for her education at Vassar College. In 1917, Millay graduated from Vassar with a BA.
After graduation, Millay and friends moved to New York City. Here, Millay met many other writers and poets, and wrote constantly. In 1920, she joined the Provincetown Playwrights and published A Few Figs From Thistles. In 1921, she traveled to Europe to write for Vanity Fair. She won a Pulitzer Prize for The Ballad of the Harp Weaver in 1923. The same year, Millay married Jan Boissevain. After the marriage, the couple built a farm in Austerlitz, New York, where Millay continued to write until her death in 1950. By the end of her life, Edna St. Vincent Millay had published sixteen poetry collections and six plays, as well as countless other works.

Reblogged from brunettebookworm

historywithwomen:

Enda St. Vincent Millay (1892 – 1950)

Enda St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright, born February 22, 1892, to Cora Bruzelle and Henry Millay, the oldest of three daughters. In 1899, her mother asked her father to leave, although they legally divorced in 1904. Millay and her mother and sister settled in Camden, Maine, where they lived with Millay’s aunt. 

Millay’s mother taught her children to be independent and ambitious, which often got them into trouble at school. While at school, Millay had relationships with several other girls there. It was here she started writing poetry, first writing in her school’s magazine. She was also published in a children’s magazine and won several awards for her poetry.

In 1912 Millay’s poem Renascence won fourth place and was published in the poetry book The Lyric Year. This success brought Millay a small amount of fame, and an offer from Caroline Dow, who heard Millay recite her poems at an inn in Camden, to pay for her education at Vassar College. In 1917, Millay graduated from Vassar with a BA.

After graduation, Millay and friends moved to New York City. Here, Millay met many other writers and poets, and wrote constantly. In 1920, she joined the Provincetown Playwrights and published A Few Figs From Thistles. In 1921, she traveled to Europe to write for Vanity Fair. She won a Pulitzer Prize for The Ballad of the Harp Weaver in 1923. The same year, Millay married Jan Boissevain. After the marriage, the couple built a farm in Austerlitz, New York, where Millay continued to write until her death in 1950. By the end of her life, Edna St. Vincent Millay had published sixteen poetry collections and six plays, as well as countless other works.

"I would like Martin Scorsese to be interested in a female character once in a while, but I don’t know if I’ll live that long."

Reblogged from msaliddell

Meryl Streep pulling weeds (via cyberqueer)

(Source: tarntino)

"I would like Martin Scorsese to be interested in a female character once in a while, but I don’t know if I’ll live that long."

Reblogged from msaliddell

Meryl Streep pulling weeds (via cyberqueer)

(Source: tarntino)

"Faggot"

Reblogged from j-moriarty

sueishappy:

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sexaulity:

This scene satisfied me in a way no man ever could.

Reblogged from gaytectives

sexaulity:

This scene satisfied me in a way no man ever could.

One day down.

6 hours of multiple choice tomorrow.

Reblogged from here-to-see-queen-mycroft

(Source: kredikshaw)

pesto28 mentioned you in a photo “Night one of all the best wishes sent to seducemymindyouidiot as she…”

…best wishes sent to seducemymindyouidiot as she starts the…

Thank you!!

Reblogged from thorwaslokid

southparkwerewolf:

powerofvoodoo:

geektoriassecret:

thatdisneylover:

HOW IS THIS SUCH BEAUTIFUL QUALITY?

CAN WE JUST TALK ABOUT THE FACT THAT THIS IS ACTUALLY JOLIE’S DAUGHTER PLAYING YOUNG AURORA AND HOW TALENTED THIS WOMAN IS TO ACT OUT NOT WANTING TO HOLD AND CUDDLE HER OWN LITTLE WOMB NUGGET LIKE GOTDAMN WOMAN YOU GOOD.

WOMB NUGGET

I wonder if Angela Jolie ever looks at the tags for Maleficent (because why not) and sees this and just goes, “What the fuck is wrong with my fans?”

Are we forgetting that this is Angelina “wearing a vial of blood around my neck” Jolie. Pretty sure that weird doesn’t shake her.

(Source: maleficent2014)

T-a little over a day until the Bar: I stood looking in my fridge for a good 10 minutes this morning, wondering if there was any expired food that I could eat that would give me food poisoning to get me out of this. 

but then Bilbo spoke to me: 


“Go back?” he thought. “No good at all! Go sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!”


P.S. The food poisoning plan is still looking pretty good. Not really…but that’s the point i’m at.