All My Obsessions

Fandom things. My own musings. Travel shenanigans. Things I find pretty. Disclaimer: Just because I reblog it, doesn't mean I agree wholeheartedly (This is largely concerning certain areas of fandom snark, some of it just gives me a giggle. I am studying for the Bar. I NEED ALL OF THE GIGGLES I CAN GET). If you're curious about anything, go ahead and ask. I'm friendly enough. If you send me an ask, tell me if you want me to publish it or not, because unless otherwise stated, i'll answer in private.

Reblogged from thegreenapplegirl

averagefairy:

when youre laying down and your pet walks across your internal organs and youre like OW FUCK and they dont even care they just keep standing on your spleen like its their job

Reblogged from hotbisexualarmydoctor

beeslock:

I’m confused as to why anyone can possibly watch Sherlock just for the cases. All the writers specifically say the show isn’t about that… it’s about the relationship between Sherlock and John.


GQ 2014

Reblogged from johnthreecontinents

GQ 2014

(Source: hailhydrra)

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric. He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

Reblogged from ameila-bianco

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric.
He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.

In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.
He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

splunge4me2:

WORK IN PROGRESS…DAY 3,874,612,793,526,001Martin Freeman as Richard IIII apologize for the crappy cell phone photo. I’m also getting to the point where I really don’t want to draw the crap on the desk, but that would just look weird, so, yea, I’ll probably draw it…

Reblogged from lilbasthet

splunge4me2:

WORK IN PROGRESS…DAY 3,874,612,793,526,001
Martin Freeman as Richard III

I apologize for the crappy cell phone photo. I’m also getting to the point where I really don’t want to draw the crap on the desk, but that would just look weird, so, yea, I’ll probably draw it…

"In August of 1889, Joseph Marshall Stoddart, who published the Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in Philadelphia, came to London to organize a British edition of his magazine. He invited Conan Doyle for dinner in London at the elegant Langham Hotel which was to be mentioned later in a number of Holmesian adventures, and he also asked Oscar Wilde, who by then was already quite well known.

Oscar Wilde appeared to be a languorous dandy, whereas Conan Doyle in spite of his best suit, looked somewhat like a walrus in Sunday clothes. Yet Oscar and Arthur got along like a house on fire. “It was indeed a golden evening for me.” Conan Doyle wrote of this meeting. As a result of this literary soirée, Lippincott’s commissioned the young doctor to write a short novel, which they published in England and the US in February of 1890. This story was The Sign of Four and was instrumental in establishing Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle once and for all in the annals of literature."

Reblogged from marta-bee

[x] So, in summary, Oscar Wilde and Arthur Conan Doyle got along “like a house on fire” and the same night that they met was instrumental in the creation of Sherlock Holmes… 

(Source: the-navel-treatment)

lilbasthet replied to your photo “Look at that side-eye. My brother is being a jackass and crinkling a…”

Aaaaaaawwwwwwww! Poor giant baby!

I know! He’s very sensitive and my brother thinks it’s funny to scare him. 

He’s like a toddler tattling on someone. 

Look at that side-eye. My brother is being a jackass and crinkling a water bottle at my poor puppy. (he’s scared of them)

Look at that side-eye. My brother is being a jackass and crinkling a water bottle at my poor puppy. (he’s scared of them)

lilbasthet replied to your post “I just applied for a cultural historian position with the Dept. of the…”

What exactly would you do in that job?

I would work under an anthropologist and help assess/take care of the historical buildings/culturally significant sites within the National Park.  It’s basically a park ranger/historian hybrid.